Karl Isakson: Wrinkles in the fabric

A solo show featuring Karl Isakson, who emphasizes the experimental process over the strictly pictorial.

About the exhibition
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Overview

Wrinkles in the Fabric by Karl Isakson, solo show curated by Martin Guinard for Collectionair.com

Karl Isakson works in a diversity of forms, ranging from digital installation to sculpture. But this exhibition puts the spotlight on his exploration the photographic medium. For the Swedish artist, the emphasis is placed on an experimental process rather than a strictly pictorial result.  

In Still Life (detail), he places sheet(s) of 4x5" film inside his shirt which then registers the light passing through the cotton. This experiment results in granular, almost abstract images. In Sketchbook (detail) series, he photographs stacks of glass sheets in which he places images. Looking at one of these stacks is like looking at all of a book’s pages at the same time. In Farewell (Your Hands), he places some photographs in chlorine and water. The pigment dissolves continuously while the image vanishes little by little. The title suddenly becomes self-explanatory as the memory encapsulated in the photograph dissolves. Isakson always goes through a thoughtful conception, a will to experiment and a need to leave room for a poetic approach. The title of the show comes from an excerpt of one of the “subtitles” of his work stating "A sheet of color negative film (4x5”) covered by a t-shirt. Wrinkles in the fabric give shelter from the light shining through." 

About the curator

Martin Guinard-Terrin is an artist and curator, with a background in History of Art and Fine Arts (Concordia, McGill, Central Saint Martins). He has worked at the Palais des Beaux-arts in Paris under the direction of Nicolas Bourriaud. He is currently co-curating an international exhibition called Reset Modernity ! at ZKM I Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe. The project is realised in collaboration with the AIME project, under the direction of the philosopher Bruno Latour.

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